I& Academy Spring 2015

I&E Academy Spring 2015 Courses

I Have an Idea. Do I Need a Lawyer?

Wednesday, January 21, 2015

5:00-6:30 p.m., Gross Hall 270

Facilitator: Jeff Ward
Lecturing Fellow
Director, Start-Up Ventures Clinic

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Every new venture—whether a community-based nonprofit or the next big tech company—will eventually need the help of legal counsel. But when should entrepreneurs and start-ups seek this counsel? When is legal help urgent and when might it wait?

The Duke Law Start-Up Ventures Clinic will offer some guidance to entrepreneurs at all stages of the start-up process. Director Jeff Ward and student-attorneys from the clinic will present some practical guidelines, and they’ll be joined by additional start-up attorneys from the area to answer your questions.


Social Entrepreneurship 101: Crafting Innovative, Sustainable Solutions to the World’s Most Pressing Problems

Saturday, January 31, 2015

10:00am-3:00 p.m., Gross Hall 270

Facilitator: Matt Nash
Managing Director, Social Entrepreneurship, Duke Innovation & Entrepreneurship Initiative (I&E)
Center Director, Social Entrepreneurship Accelerator at Duke (SEAD)


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Want to change the world? Interested in learning more about social entrepreneurship? Do you have an innovative solution that you wish to develop, or are you interested in working with others who do? Join us for an interactive workshop exploring the meaning of social entrepreneurship, drawing upon many examples of leading social entrepreneurs around the world. Learn the basics of designing your own social venture focused on social or environmental issues you care about, and discover programs and resources at Duke and that can help! Open to all Duke students. Continental breakfast, sandwich lunch, and refreshments provided. Organized by the Duke Innovation & Entrepreneurship Initiative, in collaboration with the Social Entrepreneurship Accelerator at Duke.


What’s Your Problem? Identifying Needs & Defining Problems for Social Innovation

Friday, February 6, 2015

3:00-4:30 p.m., (4:30-5:00 p.m. optional), Gross Hall 103

Facilitator: Matt Nash
Managing Director, Social Entrepreneurship, Duke Innovation & Entrepreneurship Initiative (I&E)
Center Director, Social Entrepreneurship Accelerator at Duke (SEAD)

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Social entrepreneurs seeking to develop innovative, sustainable solutions in areas such as health, poverty, education, environmental sustainability, human rights, etc., often discover that these domains are full of “wicked problems”—seemingly unsolvable, intractable challenges with multiple, often systemic causes, and interwoven, exacerbating effects on several stakeholder groups. In this session, we will discuss and apply analytical tools and methods of human-centered design for problem discovery and analysis to help social entrepreneurs and the communities with whom they engage to diagnose and frame a problem with precision and clarity, and in such a way that the root causes of the problem, not just its symptoms, will be addressed. Optional final 30 minutes to include focus on global health, in collaboration with the Social Entrepreneurship Accelerator at Duke (SEAD, www.DukeSEAD.org).


How to Deliver a Pitch

Wednesday, February 11, 2015

5:00-6:30 p.m., Gross Hall 103

Facilitator: Kip Frey
Professor of the Practice of Public Policy and Law
Director of the Program in Law & Entrepreneurship

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Theory of Change: Planning for and Measuring Your Impact

Friday, February 13, 2015

3:00-4:30 p.m., (4:30-5:00 p.m. optional), Gross Hall 103

Facilitator: Matt Nash
Managing Director, Social Entrepreneurship, Duke Innovation & Entrepreneurship Initiative (I&E)
Center Director, Social Entrepreneurship Accelerator at Duke (SEAD)


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Underlying any promising new social venture is a carefully conceived and testable hypothesis about how the venture will achieve its intended social impact. Expressing the cause-and-effect logic by which the venture’s inputs, activities, and outputs will generate desired outcomes, and identifying any critical assumptions inherent in this hypothesis, the “theory of change,” is central to the venture’s strategy and is critical to measuring and communicating the results achieved. In this session we will discuss and apply tools for articulating and refining a theory of change; we will also provide an overview of approaches to measuring the performance of a social venture and for using this information for management and organizational learning. Optional final 30 minutes to include focus on global health, in collaboration with the Social Entrepreneurship Accelerator at Duke (SEAD, www.DukeSEAD.org ).


Creating Social Value: Business Models for Social Impact

Friday, February 20, 2015

3:00-4:30 p.m., (4:30-5:00 p.m. optional), Gross Hall 103

Facilitator: Matt Nash
Managing Director, Social Entrepreneurship, Duke Innovation & Entrepreneurship Initiative (I&E)
Center Director, Social Entrepreneurship Accelerator at Duke (SEAD)


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Every organization—whether for-profit or nonprofit, commercial or social enterprise—has a business model that describes how the organization creates, delivers, and captures value. In many cases, social entrepreneurs are most creative and add the greatest value in the design of their business model–they have a wide range of options for structuring their ventures, acquiring capital, pricing their services, paying their workers, and coming to terms with suppliers. Regardless of how effective an innovation is at achieving social impact, a social venture’s business model must be “sustainable” over the period of time required to achieve widespread, lasting impact. In this session, we will explore the fundamentals of social venture business models, consider alternative models for social value creation, and apply tools for documenting and refining business models to promote greater viability, scalability, and impact. Optional final 30 minutes to include focus on global health, in collaboration with the Social Entrepreneurship Accelerator at Duke (SEAD, www.DukeSEAD.org).



Taking Control of Your Future: Personal Branding

Wednesday, March 4, 2015

5:00-6:30 p.m., Gross Hall 270

Facilitator: Jody McAuliffe
Chair of Theater Studies
Professor of the Practice of Theater Studies and Slavic and Eurasian Studies


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Take control of your future and market your personal brand! Every project—theater, social innovation, music, literature, visual arts, dance—needs a powerful elevator pitch to grab an audience’s attention. Meet Jody McAuliffe (writer, director, dramaturg) and Jeff Storer, co-founder and artistic director of Manbites Dog Theater, a professional company founded in 1986 dedicated to world and regional premieres of contemporary work. Whatever you have to pitch—a project, an event, yourself—hone your skills at delivering the sum of your idea in two minutes or less. Participants, working in teams, will be asked to formulate an “elevator pitch” about a project they’d like to do and will be given suggestions about how to improve their pitches. The session also covers what it means to be your own boss, your own business, your own agent, your own label, your own marketing, production, and accounting departments. The co-teachers will share their experience of “curating” projects and what they look for in a pitch, the need for multiple identities (artistic and otherwise) in today’s marketplace, and the experience of production.


Lean Startup

Wednesday, March 18, 2015

5:00-6:30 p.m., Gross Hall Room 103

Facilitator: Ted D. Zoller PhD
Director, Center for Entrepreneurial Studies
Kenan-Flagler Business School

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Financing Your Venture

Friday, March 20, 2015

3:00-5:00 p.m, McClendon Auditorium, Fuqua School of Business

Facilitator: David Robinson
Senior Strategist for Research, Duke Innovation & Entrepreneurship Initiative (I&E)
Professor of Finance
J. Rex Fuqua Distinguished Professor of International Management
Fuqua School of Business


Essential Intellectual Property Understandings for the Start-up Company

Wednesday, March 25, 2015

5:00-6:30 p.m., Gross Hall 270

Facilitator: Jeff Ward
Lecturing Fellow
Director, Start-Up Ventures Clinic


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Our idea is a game-changer? How do we protect it?

The value of many start-ups rests in the intellectual property, and understanding trademarks, copyrights, patents, and trade secrets is important from the very earliest stages of the entrepreneurial journey.

Come learn about the many kinds of valuable intellectual property, how to protect it, and how to avoid some common early-stage mistakes in order to protect the value of the idea in the long run.

The Duke Law School Start-Up Ventures Clinic provides legal advice and assistance to seed and early-stage entrepreneurial ventures that have not yet raised significant amounts of outside capital. The clinic assists clients in a wide variety of legal matters including formation, intellectual property protection, commercialization strategies and operational issues.


Design Thinking

Friday, March 27, 2015

3:00-4:30 p.m., EDGE Workshop Room (Bostock Library)

Facilitator: H. Christian Hölljes
North Carolina State University
Professor of Innovation + Design
Chancellor’s Faculty Excellence Program

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Every Day I’m Hustlin’: Sourcing Opportunities as an Entrepreneur

Wednesday, April 1, 2015

5:00-6:30 p.m., Gross Hall 270

Facilitator: Aaron Dinin
Co-founder of RocketBolt


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You’ve heard the phrase before: “It’s not about what you know; It’s about who you know.” That concept isn’t always true in an academic learning environment where success is usually measured by tests and papers. However, in the entrepreneurial ecosystem, having a great idea, building a great product, or demonstrating knowledge is often secondary to knowing the right people who can help you accelerate your business.

The startup community has adopted a term for someone who focuses on building these kinds of strategic connections: a hustler. What does it take to be a “hustler”? Come find out during this interactive “crash course” on leveraging your existing network, growing your network, and sourcing strategic opportunities from that network. Even if you don’t learn anything, at least you’ll meet some new people, and… well… that’s kind of the point.


Legal Incorporation and Common Early-Stage Issues for Social Ventures

Wednesday, April 8, 2015

5:00-6:30 p.m., Gross Hall 270

Facilitator: Jeff Ward
Lecturing Fellow
Director, Start-Up Ventures Clinic

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Your organization will bring together a group of dedicated people to better communities and take on some of the world’s most pressing problems. What business type do you choose? Will it be a for-profit, a nonprofit, a hybrid of some sort?

Come learn about the many legal choices that social entrepreneurs have when creating an organizational vehicle of change. Walk through a decision tree to learn how to make key choices. And learn to identify common early-stage issues that will help your venture to launch from solid legal ground.

The Duke Law School Start-Up Ventures Clinic provides legal advice and assistance to seed and early-stage entrepreneurial ventures that have not yet raised significant amounts of outside capital. The clinic assists clients in a wide variety of legal matters including formation, intellectual property protection, commercialization strategies and operational issues.

The Duke Law School Community Enterprise Clinic is a resource for non-profit organizations and low-wealth entrepreneurs working to improve the quality of life in low-wealth communities through community economic development strategies.


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